CHANGING SEVERIETY OF CHILDHOOD MALARIA IN AN ENDEMIC MALARIAL AREA OF INDIA

Satpathy R1, Nanda NC1, Pant KC1, Das BS1, Ratho S1 and Panigrahi P2

1 Ispat General Hospital, Rourkela C769005, India

2 University Maryland, School of Medicine, USA

 

Objective: Orissa State in India with 4% of the population of the country contributes to nearly 50% of the malarial death in India. Ispat General hospital (IGH) situated in the district of Sundergarh is one of the endemic districts of Orissa state. With rise in malarial deaths among children an effort was made to review the presentation, complication, severity and outcome.

Method: A retrospective search of records of 1991 and prospective collection of the data of 2000 of childhood malaria was made in a pre-designed format. The format constituted clinical history, symptoms, signs, complication and outcome with treatment of the recommended drug. Annual admission of the department of Pediatrics, age, sex and address were recorded. A comparative report was prepared for conclusion.

Result: Of total indoor admissions malaria cases were 15% in 2000 and 3.8% in 1991. Malignant tertian malaria was 93.5 %and 70.4% .The incidence of cerebral malaria, jaundice, black water fever, acute renal failure, sepsis and multi-organ involvement was found to be more in proportion. Deaths due to malaria was 22 in 2000 and 1 in 1991.

Conclusion: Malaria presented with more severity than before in children .The reason of such changed clinical presentation could be use of newer non-malarial drugs, failure to response to quinine and bioenvironmental degradation.

 

 
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